Oct 25, 2014
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Style & Vibes

Fashion Fridays: “To The Moon” Tees From Gazoo + Dope Life

Words by Marcha M. Johnson—

Gazoo-to-the-moon-spring-collection-2014-dope-life

From designer catalogs to airports, clubs and even his very own café in Bushwick, Palates, the diversity of mediums through which “The Black Sand Artist” Jason “Gazoo” Allen‘s work manifests itself seems limitless. His aesthetic, inspired by his Caribbean heritage from the island of Montserrat, can even be seen in music videos by Ryan Leslie, Rune RK, and, most recently, Mr. Vegas. The just-released clip for Vegas’ “Party Tun Up” featuring Sean Paul and Fatman Scoop was shot at WIP Night Club, where Gazoo served as art director (though you may know it better as the spot where Drake and Chris Brown duked it out over Rihanna). Check the video below.

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Style and VIbes: A Look Back at Dancehall Fashion, Pt. 4: The 2000s

Words by Mikelah Rose

In the early to mid 2000’s, it seemed like everyone caught a little dancehall fever. Shaggy, Sean Paul and Beenie Man were at the forefront of the crossover movement, and their international success piqued fans’ interest in what was really going on in the dancehall. Fans around the world wanted to emulate styles straight from the source, and people who weren’t Caribbean wanted to rock Puma gear with Jamaican flag colors—well before Usain Bolt was breaking world records.

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Style & Vibes: A Look Back At Dancehall Fashion, Pt. 3: The 90s

Words by Mikelah Rose

If you ask most dancehall aficionados, the ’90s is usually their favorite era musically. It was also the most visually stimulating era, especially when it came to the women. The dances got sexier and the fashion became just as raunchy, with “bare as you dare” scantily clad style becoming more and more prevalent as the decade went on. For this new generation of dancehall queens, it was always about outdoing the next gal with your own signature style. Popular trends included jumpsuits, ankle-length shorts, knee-length vests and jackets and pants three times as big…and that’s just the men! Some of the ladies put a feminine twist on baggy fashion with a feminine twist, while others were ready to “skin out” with g-string body suits, cutout dresses and, of course, the ubiquitous pum pum shorts.

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Style & Vibes: A Look Back at Dancehall Fashion, Pt. 2: The 1980s

Words by Mikelah Rose

As dancehall deejays elevated their lyrics to another level in the 1980s, they also elevated their style game. In addition to being able to toast with the best of them, you had to step out on stage correct lyrically and stylistically, because commanding a dancehall crowd was–and still is –no easy task. The ’80s were a fashion era that we look back at and say, “What were they thinking!?!” but then again, fashion is all about self-expression. Like they say in the dancehall, “Style ah style an style cyan spoil!” The ’80s were filled with Kangols, gold chains and blazers with extra shoulder padding–as the era progressed, the clothes got bigger and more colorful, and gold accessories were in excess.

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Style & Vibes: A Look Back at Dancehall Fashion, Pt. 1: The 1970s

Words by Mikelah Rose

Equally influenced by their international counterparts in the British and American music scenes and by the heavy influence of Rastafarian culture via reggae music, dancehall fashion in the 1970’s was a mix of simplicity and over-the-top suiting. While reggae was gaining popularity through the Caribbean and all over the world in 1970’s, disco and R&B were also very popular in the islands. The defining fashions of the era such as polyester suits, bell-bottom jeans, mid-drift tops for the ladies and, of course, platform shoes were all in style in Jamaica, as they were in the US and Europe.

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Style & Vibes: Q+A with Butch Diva’s Tiffany Rhodes

Words by Mikelah Rose

We first featured Butch Diva when pictures of owner Tiffany Rhodes and Dancehall diva Patra surfaced last week. An avid dancehall fan circa ’90s era and inspired by the culture, Tiffany teaming up with the “Queen of the Pack” Patra was ultimately fate. After meeting, the pair instantly felt a sistren-ship and Patra has now become the face of Butch Diva. Brooklyn-based Tiffany Rhodes is the designer behind Butch Diva, a hardcore yet feminine line of spandex wear with an edge. The standalone pieces, high-waisted skirts, shorts and jumpsuits with bold colors and unique patterns, are made for boss-lady, fashion-forward risktakers from the concrete jungle to an island fete.

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