Apr 20, 2014
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Posts tagged: Protoje

AUDIO: Protoje + Chronixx Ask “Who Knows”

Words by Jesse Serwer—

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Protoje‘s 8-Year Affair was one of our favorite Caribbean albums of 2013—maybe even our favorite, a mature sophomore release from an artist who had definitely found his sound. That sound being a contemporary, hip-hop-inflected spin on the militant, dubwise ’80s reggae of Black Uhuru, Aswad, etc.

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Toppa Top 10: The Best Reggae Tunes of 2013


Words by LargeUp Crew, Photo by Martei Korley—

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Toppa Top 10: The Baddest Mixtapes of 2013

Words by Deejay Theory —

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LargeUp Premiere: Major Lazer & Walshy Fire Present Suns of Dub

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A group, record label and sound system based between Jamaica, Trinidad and New Jersey, Suns of Dub is led by Addis Pablo, son of the late great Augustus Pablo, and producer/label co-CEO, Ras Jammy. Over the last few years the unit, which also consists of artists Masia One (Canada), Jah Bami (Trinidad) and Zebulun (Trinidad) and drummer Tesfa Zion, has released a steady stream of innovative tracks blending and bridging the gap between traditional dub featuring—Addis has taken up the mantle for the melodica, the instrument his father legitimized on his landmark projects with King Tubby and his own Rockers International—and modern EDM.

As he did with Chronixx last year, Walshy Fire of Major Lazer has stepped up to put things in perspective, gathering Suns of Dub’s key tracks, along with original remixes and unreleased tunes, for global consumption. Showcasing the crew’s diversity, the mix runs through Reggae, dub, dubstep, dancehall, trap, hip-hop, drum and bass and even some steelpan made in Port of Spain, Trinidad, with pannist Derron Ellies. Things start out with “Vybz Wa Yuh Feel,” a track featured in Part 2 of our Meditations video series featuring Addis Pablo and Jesse Royal (Watch Part One starring Ras Jammy and Jesse Royal here), which you can watch below (or get the full experience here).

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Meditations, Part One: Jesse Royal + Ras Jammy (Suns of Dub)

Words by Tony Lowe, Video by Tony Lowe and Taliesin Gilkes-Bower—

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For the first time in years, dancehall has some competition in Jamaica. Touching down in Kingston over the last year, the energy of the “new roots” movement was impossible to miss. Chronixx’s smash-hit “Odd Ras,” an anthemic manifesto for the young and righteous, rang seemingly on repeat from every sound, and increasingly common live performances by Jah 9 and Protoje blazed with mythic power. Armed with Rasta philosophy and criss Rockers style, this tight-knit but massive crew of young musicians—which also includes Jesse Royal, Addis Pablo and the Suns of Dub, Kabaka Pyramid, the No-Maddz, Raging Fyah, Kelissa, and more—are bringing roots and culture back into focus.

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Top Honors: Ini Kamoze

Words by Jesse Serwer—

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Many know Ini Kamoze from “Here Comes the Hotstepper,” the massive reggae/hip-hop crossover single from 1994. Others may recognize his as the voice sampled by Damian Marley (“Out in the streets they call it merther!”) on “Welcome To Jamrock.” In 1984, when he released his first music for Chris Blackwell’s Island and Mango labels, Kamoze (real name Cecil Campbell) was considered by some to be the future of reggae.

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