Oct 31, 2014
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Posts tagged: Haiti

Visual Culture: Caribbean Art Takes Over NYC

Words by Jesse Serwer—

New York City is the biggest melting pot for Caribbean culture there is, so it’s affirming to see the city’s cultural institutions finally put together an event that’s reflective of this. Spread out between three venues—El Museo del Barrio (through Jan. 6); Queens Museum of Art (through Jan. 6); and the Studio Museum in Harlem (through Oct. 21)— “Caribbean: Crossroads of the World” is “the big art event of the summer season in New York,” The New York Times wrote, and “likely the most expansive art event of the summer,” according to ArtInfo.

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Video: Stacy Barthe Wants to “Keep It Like It Is”

Words by Jesse Serwer—

Big week over here for tunes about being over it. First Tarrus Riley told his ex-flame he’s “Not Missing You” with an exclusive LargeUp premiere of his song by that name, and now we have the video for “Keep It Like It Is” from Stacy Barthe, the Haitian/Dominican songwriter for Rihanna/Britney Spears/Katy Perry turned John Legend-affiliated artist. The Supa Dups-produced reggae joint from Barthe’s In the InBetween EP, which we featured in purely audio form back in February, is an ice-cold sayonara to an ex who just won’t take the hint. Barthe, on the other hand, shows just how past him (note singer Luke James‘ image in the burning photo) she is by tooling around the islands on a motorboat and liming with her band. Stacy looks like she’s having the time of her life—no wonder dude is trying to creep back into it.

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Throwback Thursdays x Sofrito: Lord Shorty, “Vibrations Groove”

Words by Jesse Serwer—

“I want to introduce you to a brand new musical sound called soca…it starts with di bass drum.” That’s the late Lord Shorty (later known as Ras Shorty I), father of soca music, getting his James Brown on, with an instrument-by-instrument breakdown of his then-new creation.

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Toppa Top 10: Ten Best Caribbean Street Foods


Words by Jesse Serwer and Jillionaire—

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Cross Blends: Kuduro in the Caribbean

Words by Jesse Serwer, via Ghetto Bassquake

From Vamanos’ Ghetto Bassquake blog comes an interesting report on the growing popularity of Angolan kuduro music in the Caribbean and the Caribbean diaspora. The writer, Rainstick, describes a surprise run-in with “Danca Do Sal” fom Angola’s Helder, a landmark record for kuduro—a hybrid of African and Caribbean rhythms (specifically soca), techno and house music which developed in Angola in the ’90s and has since become a major part of the soundscape in Africa’s former Portuguese colonies—on Haitian pirate radio in Brooklyn, only to learn that the sound has taken root not just in Haiti but in St. Lucia, too.

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Now Things: A Q+A with Watch the Throne Producer Sham “Sak Pase” Joseph

Words by Jesse Serwer—

Haitian-American producer Shama (Sham) Joseph first landed on our radar with his production for Rihanna’s “Man Down.” The reggae-flavored hit (now officially a touchstone) brought RiRi back to her Caribbean roots but also grabbed our attention with the opening tag, “Sak Pase!”— “What’s happening” in Kreyòl. Building on the momentum of “Man Down,” Sham placed “Who Gon Stop Me” and “Made it in America,” two of the best tracks on Kanye West and Jay-Z’s blockbuster Watch the Throne album. Apparently, he was just getting warmed up, though, as a partial list of the artists he’s working with currently reads like a list of hip-hop, R&B and dancehall’s biggest hitmakers of the last 10 years: Sean Paul, T.I., Keyshia Cole, Usher, Ciara, Busta Rhymes, Chris Brown, Mavado. So whether you’ve got Haitian friends or not, get used to hearing “Sak Pase!” a whole hell of a lot. We recently spoke with the Fort Lauderdale, Florida native over the phone from his current homebase in Atlanta.

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