Apr 21, 2014
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Posts tagged: Aswad

Toppa Top 10: Ten Hidden Dennis Brown Gems


Words by Martei Korley, Photo by David Corio

Dennis Brown

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Impressions: Images From Rebel Salute


Photos by Martei Korley—

Marcia Griffiths at Rebel Salute

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Throwback Thursdays: Vintage Notting Hill Carnival Videos


Words by Jesse Serwer, Photos by Norman Craig

notting-hill-1981-norman-craig

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Toppa Top 10: Ten Reggae Make-Up Songs


Words by Jesse Serwer and Sherman Escoffery

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Toppa Top 10: Ten Quintessential British Lovers Rock Tunes

Words by Jesse Serwer, Eddie STATS and Martei Korley

With a documentary about the hidden history of lovers rock coming out this week (in U.K. theaters only, naturally), a primer on this somewhat misunderstood sub-genre seemed in order. At its heart, lovers rock is two things, a distinctly British musical movement which developed and evolved in London’s Caribbean communities in the 1970s, and the “Quiet Storm” to reggae’s R&B, a mellower version of the basic blueprint that developed expressly for intimate occasions, slow dancing or perhaps melancholic daydreaming about that one that got away. While the sound was re-transmitted back to the original source in Jamaica by artists who came to England to record or just fell in love with the sound—Sugar Minott, Dennis Brown, Gregory Isaacs and Al Campbell, to name a few—we’ve focused this list on those British artists who most embodied the style.

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Heds and Dreds: Annotated Tribe Called Quest for the Unseasoned Patois Interpeter

Words by Jesse Serwer

If you know your Jazz from your Rhime, you’re probably aware of Phife Dawg’s Caribbean roots. Sometimes thought to to be Jamaican due to his love for reggae and patois inflections, A Tribe Called Quest’s Five Foot Assassin is actually 100-percent Trinidadian. Lesser known is that Q-Tip, too, is of Caribbean heritage: his late father was from Montserrat. Catching the new Tribe documentary Beats, Rhymes & Life last week we were reminded of just how much patois, dancehall lyrics and general yard-isms the Quest MCs spiced their rhymes with. Michael Rapaport’s movie doesn’t delve into this aspect of Tribe’s background but it did have us pulling our Midnight Marauders, The Low End Theory and even The Love Movement LPs out of the crates, and even catching some references we’d never noticed before. Here’s a look at the 10 most yardwise (and Trini-wise) tunes in the Tribe catalog.

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