Oct 25, 2014
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Not a Dubclaat: Edward Seaga Praises “The Origins Of Jamaican Music,” Except Dub

Words by Sherman Escoffery–

Former Jamaican Prime Minister Edward Seaga finally arrived in New York City last week, after being delayed by Hurricane Sandy—that had shut down the entire Island of Jamaica. Vivien Goldman, writer and broadcaster, sat with him at the Tisch-School of the Arts, NYU, for a very informative and educational discussion about his latest project–that we had mentioned last month on LargeUp, The Reggae Golden Jubilee 50th Anniversary; a commemorative, one hundred tracks, four CD box set, that showcases the origin and evolution of Jamaican music in its 50th year of independence, 2012. Mr. Seaga, an early pioneer in Jamaican music, conceptualized and selected every song on this album. He started working on this project three years ago with VP records, and the late Joel Chin—who was killed in 2011. Now finished and slated for release on November 6, 2012, this collection of one hundred songs, highlights significant milestones in Jamaican musical history; such as, the beginning and highlights of Ska, Rocksteady, Reggae and eventually Dancehall. There is also a 64 page booklet in this package, with liner notes by Chris Chin, Reggae historians John Masouri, Dermot Hussey, and Mr. Edward Seaga himself; making this box set a must have, or an excellent gift, for anyone who listens to Jamaican music.

Mr. Seaga also took questions from the audience at NYU, but what shocked many in the audience was his surprising response to a question about his thoughts about dub music. Mr. Seaga expressed his lack respect for dub, saying, “It is minimal performance in the recording, with too much space left; and that is why DJ music followed immediately-with toasting by artist like U-Roy- filling in the space.”

A former music producer and record company owner turned politician, Mr. Seaga contributed significantly to early Jamaica music, so his opinion has to be taken into serious consideration, even if you disagree with him. He also said that the Jamaican government would have ruined music if they had gotten involved in spearheading music. The normally stoic Seaga, even displayed a sense of humor by joking that Dawn Penn’s “No No No,” might even have been taken as song of protest. An anthropologist and musicologist, Mr. Seaga never seemed passionate about current Jamaican music, but still expressed his respect for where the music has evolved to, and had high praises for modern artists such as Etana, Beenie Man and Shaggy; He also expressed his appreciation to Chin family, especially the matriarch Patricia Chin O.D., for their work in producing, securing and promoting Jamaican music, that has even allowed him to compile this box set.


Olivia “Babsy” Grange and her Mentor Edward Seaga

Edward Seaga was accompanied on this trip by one of his former protégé, former Minister of Culture Olivia “Babsy” Grange, who also had her role in Jamaican music as the CEO of Spec-Shang music—that introduced the world to artists such as Shabba Ranks, Lady Patra and Mad Cobra.


(L-R)Patrica Chin, Edward Seaga signs a box set at VP records, Luisa Calio. Photo Courtesy: Luisa Calio

Full track listing for Edward Seaga and VP Records’ Reggae Golden Jubilee: Origins of Jamaican Music

Disc One
1. Easy Snapping (Original Version) – Theophilus Beckford
2. Dumplings – Byron Lee & The Dragonaires
3. Manny Oh – Higgs & Wilson
4. Oh Carolina – The Folkes Brothers
5. They Got To Go – Prince Buster
6. Independent Jamaica – Lord Creator
7. Black Head Chinaman – Price Buster
8. Blazing Fire – Derrick Morgan
9. Wash Wash – Prince Buster
10. Sammy Dead – Eric ‘Monty’ Morris
11. My Boy Lollipop – Millie Smalls
12. Carry Go Bring Come – Justin Hinds & The Dominoes
13. Occupation – Don Drummond & The Skatalites
14. Little Did You Know – The Techniques
15. Dancing Mood – Delroy Wilson
16. Rough And Tough – Stranger Cole
17. Take It Easy – Hopeton Lewis
18. Every Night – Chuck & Joe White
19. Rock Steady – Alton Ellis
20. Tougher Than Tough (Rudie In Court) – Derrick Morgan with
Desmond Dekker & The Aces
21. No More Heartaches – The Beltones
22. The Tide Is High – The Paragons
23. Trench Town Rock – Bob Marley & The Wailers
24. Israelites (a.k.a. Poor Me Israelites) – Desmond Dekker & The Aces
25. Sweet And Dandy – The Maytals
26. Everything Crash – The Ethiopians
27. Satta Massa Gana – The Abyssinians
28. Fire Corner – King Stitt
29. Java Dub – Impact All Stars
30. Hypocrite – The Heptones

Disc Two
31. Wear You To The Ball – U- Roy & The Paragons
32. Cherry Oh Baby – Eric Donaldson
33. 54-46 Was My Number (Stick It Up Mister) – Toots & The Maytals
34. Them A Fi Get A Beatin’ – Peter Tosh
35. Many Rivers To Cross – Jimmy Cliff
36. The Sun Shines For Me – Bob Andy
37. Marcus Garvey – Winston ‘Burning Spear’ Rodney
38. Fade Away – Junior Byles
39. Lady With The Star Light – Ken Boothe
40. Right Time – Mighty Diamonds
41. Police And Thieves – Junior Murvin
42. Ram Goat Liver – Pluto Shervington
43. We De People/ The Power And The Glory – Ernie Smith
44. Two Sevens Clash – Culture
45. It’s Alright – Bob Marley
46. Forward Ever – Jacob Miller
47. My Number One – Gregory Isaacs
48. Money In My Pocket – Dennis Brown
49. Kaya – Bob Marley
50. Rub-A-Dub Style – Michigan & Smiley
51. Uptown Top Ranking – Althea & Donna
52. Land Of My Birth – Eric Donaldson
53. Silly Games – Janet Kay
54. Someone Loves You Honey – June ‘J.C.’ Lodge
55. Guess Who’s Coming To Dinner – Black Uhuru
56. Arlene – General Echo

Disc Three
57. Over Me – Yellowman
58. One Two – Sister Nancy
59. Pass The Dutchie – Musical Youth
60. I’m Getting Married In The Morning – Yellowman
61. Try Jah Love – Third World
62. Push Comes To Shove – Freddie McGregor
63. Love Has Found Its Way – Dennis Brown
64. Cottage In Negril – Tyrone Taylor
65. Every Time A Ear De Soun’ – Mutabaruka
66. Electric Boogie – Marcia Griffiths
67. Under Me Sleng Teng – Wayne Smith
68. Greetings – Half Pint
69. No Way Better Than Yard – Admiral Bailey
70. Wild World – Maxi Priest
71. Cover Me – Tinga Stewart & Ninjaman
72. Wild Gilbert – Lovindeer
73. Pocomania Day – Lovindeer & Chalice
74. Good Thing Going – Sugar Minott
75. One Blood – Junior Reid
76. Twice My Age – Shabba Ranks & Krystal
77. Hello Africa – Garnett Silk
78. Murder She Wrote – Chaka Demus & Pliers

Disc Four
79. Putting Up A Resistance – Beres Hammond
80. You Don’t Love Me (No, No, No) – Dawn Penn
81. Murderer – Buju Banton
82. Tour – Capleton
83. Lord Give Me Strength – Luciano
84. Untold Stories – Buju Banton
85. Fed Up – Rodney ‘ Bounty Killer’ Price
86. Sycamore Tree – Lady Saw
87. Black Woman & Child – Sizzla
88. Who Am I (Sim Simma) – Beenie Man
89. Down By The River – Morgan Heritage
90. Virtuous Woman – Warrior King
91. Gimme The Light – Sean Paul
92. Pon De River, Pon De Bank – Elephant Man
93. Welcome To Jamrock – Damian ‘Jr. Gong’ Marley
94. She’s Royal – Tarrus Riley
95. True Reflections – Jah Cure
96. Roots – Etana
97. Boombastic – Shaggy
98. Lioness On The Rise – Queen Ifrica
99. On The Rock – Mavado
100. The Harder They Come – Jimmy Cliff



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  • Amy Wachtel

    this was a great event for true. an honor to be there. it was David Baram, former co-owner of legendary Long Island nightclub My Father’s Place, and entertainment attorney, who asked the Prime Minister about Dub Music. admittedly, Mr. Seaga’s answer, filled with nothing but contempt for the genre, shocked the audience. It lead to jokes like “Can’t Dub” (Chalice) and “Dubbing Is A Must” – NOT! (Pablo Moses). kidding aside, this was really a treat. It was Good to Be There. Give thanks to all involved.

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